News

Kumawu District records zero mortality case in four years

For the fourth consecutive year, the Sekyere Kumawu Health Directorate of the Ghana Health Service has not recorded any maternal nor infant mortality case throughout last year.

The District Health Director, Mr. Justice Thomas Sevugu, who announced this at the directorate’s Annual Performance Review at Kumawu last week Tuesday, said, the directorate achieved the Millennium Development Goals ( MDG ) 3 and 4,  having  achieved the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 3 in 2012, and maintained the status to date, making it the fourth year in succession in the district without  any case of maternal and  infant mortality. 

Mr. Sevugu further stated that the district health management team was able to reduce the impact on certain major causes of OPD attendance in the district.

He said malaria cases, for instance, dropped swiftly from 45% in 2013 to 21% at the end of 2016.

The Health Director said his team also worked hard to reduce the rate of stillbirths among pregnant women, disclosing that his outfit recorded only seven cases of stillbirths during the year under review.

He hinted that a clinical audit conducted on stillbirth cases revealed that two out of the seven were due to insertion of herbs with intention to facilitate safe and easy delivery.

A worried Health Director said the administration of such substances, as well as usage of certain herbal concoctions during pregnancy, could be every dangerous, since the toxic levels of herbs is difficult to determine or control.

As a result, the District Health Directorate has referred the matter to the Kumawu Traditional Council to facilitate an engagement between the directorate and herbal medicine practitioners in the district, to find means of curbing the practice, described as unhealthy and unacceptable.

Director Sevugu, however, described the general operations of the directorate during the year under review as successful, yet challenging, in the face of limited resources and logistics.

Pix: Justice Thomas Sevugu

 

Stories by Sebastian R. Freiku

Tags