Health News

Only three Italian regions in red zone as coronavirus infections fall

A hairdresser brushes a woman's hair at Aldo Coppola Rinascente hair salon, as from today in Milan, shops and hair salons are reopened after easing the coronavirus restrictions. Photo: Claudio Furlan/LaPresse via ZUMA Press/dpa
A hairdresser brushes a woman’s hair at Aldo Coppola Rinascente hair salon, as from today in Milan, shops and hair salons are reopened after easing the coronavirus restrictions. Photo: Claudio Furlan/LaPresse via ZUMA Press/dpa

Only three of Italy’s regions will be classified as so-called coronavirus red zones from next week, the government said on Sunday, following a fall in infections numbers.

Red zone rules include the closure of non-essential shops and restaurants, along with stricter travel curbs. From Monday, those will only apply to Puglia, Sardinia and the Aosta Valley.

There is growing optimism in the country of 60 million people as coronavirus incidence rates are on the overall decline and more people receive vaccines.

Monday, April 26, is circled on the calendar of many: That’s the date Prime Minister Mario Draghi says outdoor activities can resume.

For instance, restaurants in areas deemed to have moderate infection levels will once again be allowed to serve guests for open-air dining.

A phased roadmap with relaxations from April to July is being planned, including the lifting of domestic travel bans. At the moment, travel across regional borders is only allowed in exceptional cases.

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Meanwhile, politicians continue to argue over the merits of keeping in place night-time curfews.

Right-wing parties, including Matteo Salvini’s co-governing Lega, and restaurateurs are calling for an end to a curfew in place between 10 pm and 5 am.

Deputy Health Minister Pierpaolo Sileri rejected this in an interview with the La Stampa newspaper on Sunday, saying the infection figures remain too high.

The regional president of Liguria, Giovanni Toti, on the other hand, wrote on Facebook that people eat late in Italy: “I honestly don’t see the need for diners to gobble everything up in a few minutes to rush home.”

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