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Colorado teen sues KOAA TV station for $1m ‘after broadcasting his erect penis’

  • The 14-year-old boy spoke to a TV news reporter about sexting dangers
  • The boy’s family agreed he could talk to KOAA in Colorado anonymously
  • However, the boy claimed his erect penis was shown on YouTube 
  • Since the story, the family has moved from Colorado to South Carolina

By

Darren Boyle for MailOnline


Published:
06:00 EST, 8 February 2016

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Updated:
08:47 EST, 8 February 2016

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A family is suing a TV station for $1 million in damages over they inadvertently broadcast footage of a teenager’s erect penis while covering a story on the dangers of ‘sexting’. 

TV station KOAA in Colorado received permission from the bow’s family to broadcast the story as long as the youngster was not identified and the station did not use his name. 

The TV station first made contact with the youngster and his family two years ago amid claims that the boy was being blackmailed because of the images.

The boy spoke to TV reporter Matt Prichard, pictured, about the dangers of sexting on KOAA in Colorado

The boy spoke to TV reporter Matt Prichard, pictured, about the dangers of sexting on KOAA in Colorado

The teenager's family are claiming $1million in damages following the TV news report in 2014 (file photo)

The teenager’s family are claiming $1million in damages following the TV news report in 2014 (file photo)

The 14-year-old’s family agreed to be interviewed by reporter Matt Prichard in relation to a ‘sexting gone wrong’ story. 

The lawsuit claims the boys name was published above the clip during the broadcast. 

At the time of the broadcast, the family were living in St Pueblo, Colorado but have since moved to Hollywood, South Carolina.

However, when the story, which was filmed two years ago, was broadcast, the family claimed the YouTube version of the story featured the boy’s erect penis.

The family’s lawsuit claimed: the youngster has ‘suffered damages as a result of the Defendant’s actions, including, but not limited to, emotional damage from the embarrassment of the story, loss of friendships, alienation, relocation, depression, self-esteem problems, transfer of schools and education facilities, and other damages related to the mental and brain development of minor children.’ 

The story was broadcast on February 24, 2014 by the TV station. 

According to tech website Ars Technica, the TV station defended their actions. 

A spokesman said: ‘At the specific request of the victim’s father, we ran a story two years ago about his son being blackmailed over a cell phone video. While we are unable to discuss the specifics of this recently filed litigation, we will defend ourselves against unfounded accusations.’ 

The boy’s lawyer Matthew Schneide said he was not authorised to discuss the case.

 

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