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South Park skewers QAnon with Hillary and Oprah drinking kids’ blood and microchip vaccines: ‘What you believe is really stupid’

The Comedy Central show mocks the pro-Trump conspiracy theory and even features the QAnon Shaman, who was arrested at the Capitol riot in January.

And the show’s creators Matt Stone and Trey Parker do not pull any punches in the controversial one-hour special.

“You guys have a right to say and believe whatever you want, okay? But what you believe is really stupid,” Cartman tells a member of the radicalised Lil’Qties QAnon group that has sprung up at the school among pupils.

When teacher Mr Garrison returns to South Park after four years as president of the United States, the town’s QAnon group, run by Bob White, takes action and sets up their own tutoring service called “Tuternon.”

“Vaccinations are just another way for the elites to control us,” says Mr White as he blasts Hollywood stars for drinking blood from children and claims that the government is microchipping American’s through vaccines.

The Shaman, is one of those tutors, and he claims that Tom Hanks and Oprah Winfrey are part of an elite group that “feed off children to maintain their elite status.”

“When Jeffrey Epstein, the billionaire, was found guilty of sex trafficking, he was set to squeal on all the elites in Hollywood and in Washington and who used his child sex services,” the voiceover says.

“But Epstein was found dead from ‘suicide.’ Why do the elites want children from sex traffickers?

“Adrenochrome is harvested from children for euphoric and life enhancing benefit.

“This satanic cabal of Hollywood and political elites all need the Adrenochrome to maintain their positions of power and they will continue to do so until we stand up against them.”

In the show the friends play a nasty and very personal trick on their teacher, Mrs Nelson, who quits her job.

“You think this is funny? I risk my life to come here and teach you and I can’t even get vaccinated,” she tells them in disgust.

“I can’t hear you I have to many antibodies in my ears,” one of the elderly people tells the line of residents waiting outside, as a night-club bouncer turns them away.

“Say when are they gonna vaccinate you kids? Oh yeah you’re last,” shouts another.

The friends decide to try and make things right with Mrs Nelson and talk their way into getting a batch of vaccines by saying they are for vulnerable older residents.

The friends eventually bring them to the elementary school to vaccinate the teachers.

When they got there they were confronted by the radicalised LiL’ Qties, led by Scott Malkinson.

Just as the QAnon crowd looks set to riot and prevent the vaccines from being delivered, Mr Garrison arrives and having partnered with “the elites” an ‘Air Israel’ plane showed up with enough vaccines for the town.

“I came here expecting things to go back to normal, but we’ve all been through the proverbial b***hole of hardships lately,” he told the town.

“And in times of crisis, when we need each other most, it’s sometimes when we grow furthest apart

“But through it all, Mr White here has taught me a very important lesson: Make sure you’re on the side of the people with the most power.”

The satirical comedy show was created by Matt Stone and Trey Parker and made its debut on US TV in 1997.

The last series finished in December 2019 and the new episode was the follow up to last year’s pandemic special, which was the Comedy Central’s most popular episode in seven years with more than 4 million viewers.

The show has always courted controversy and in season nine its “Trapped in the Closet” episode centered on the origins of Scientology.

In season five the show tackled sex education and the episode was banned in the UK.

And in season 14, the creators were threatened with violence after they angered the Muslim community with an episode that dealt with the prophet Muhammad. It was eventually censored by Comedy Central but leaked online.